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Friday, April 8, 2011

Why is Congress being paid for not meeting a deadline?


Federal government shutdown could see 800,000 staff suspended

Barack Obama and John Boehner in budget talks to secure last-minute deal amid threat of widespread disruption to services  http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/apr/08/federal-government-shutdown-obama-boehner

OF COURSE THIS IS ESSENTIAL!!!!

Government shutdown won't halt DC's Cherry Blossom parade

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By Laura Bly, USA TODAY
The National Cherry Blossom Festival Parade will go on as scheduled Saturday, even if last-minute budget negotiations fail and the federal government shuts down at midnight.

By Laura Bly/USAT
Parade spokeswoman Danielle Piacente told the Associated Press that since part of the original parade route on Constitution Avenue is under National Park juridiction, if there is a government shutdown, the parade will run Saturday morning on Constitution from 7th Street to 14th Street to avoid crossing into Park Service territory. Piacente says D.C. police would provide extra support if U.S. Park Police aren't available.

HERE IS THE RUNDOWN ...
With less than 24 hours left until a likely federal government shutdown, the city is full of anxiety about how Congress' squabbling will put a crimp in our daily routines. What can you expect living in a town which is at the total whim of the constantly bickering lawmakers in Congress? Behold, an encyclopedic guide to the shutdown's effect on the District!
Anti-Deficiency Act: Under this law, passed in 1884 and revised in 1950, "the expenditure of funds by any branch of the Federal government unless those funds have been appropriated by Congress" are illegal. In modern layman's terms, it means that it's against the law for the hundreds of thousands of federal workers who would be forced into a furlough to check their email or voicemails during the disruption. (Of course, no one's ever been prosecuted for violating it.)
Department of [Insert City Service Here]: Wondering whether you'll be able to get a permit from the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs, renew your driver's license at the Department of Motor Vehicles or contact the Office of Motion Picture Development? Nope, nope and nope. But there are District agencies that will be up and running -- check this list for who's working and who isn't.
Jury Duty: As we noted yesterday, the city's courts will still be open, so those of you who are supposed to show up at Moultrie for jury duty will still be expected to do so.
Libraries: Thinking this weekend might have been a good time to check out the District's sparkly new libraries in Petworth, Tenleytown and Shaw? No dice, they'll all be closed -- though you could always try your luck with neighboring jurisdictions' book depositories, who would welcome you in with open arms.
National Mall: During the last shutdown in 1995, a large portion of the monuments around the Mall were closed -- and the National Parks Conservation Association says that the Washington, Lincoln, Jefferson, and others will be closed again this time. But the Mall itself should remain open, so at least Sunday's Kite Festival could conceivably go on as planned.
Smithsonian: The Institution, whose attractions were estimated to bring in 3.8 million visitors this month, would be closed down. (On the plus side: fewer chances to be enraged by 19th century breasts.)
Trash: Yes, city pickup will be suspended for a week -- so make good use of those Supercans , and do your neighbors a favor and try to keep it from piling up in the District's gutters. Or, you know, just drop it off at John Boehner's place.
UDC: The District's public schools might still be handing out knowledge and lunches, but classes at the city's university will cease, potentially putting graduation in doubt for students, should a shutdown last for any extended period of time.
Zoo: Nope, no lion cubs for anyone, which is just wrong. Come on, Congress, cut us a break here.

Government Shutdown Would Delay Tax Refunds



The head of the IRS conceded Wednesday that a federal government shutdown -- threatened for as early as 12:01 a.m. Saturday morning -- would delay refunds for taxpayers who file their returns on paper rather than electronically.

'Non-Essential' Workers: Back Away from the Blackberry

Friday, April 8, 2011 | 9:15 a.m.

As the looming threat of a government shutdowninches nearer, federal agencies are issuing a strict array of directives for how "non-essential" employees should conduct themselves in the event of a shutdown. In short: Don't work—don't even think about working. This includes "telework" or logging on to your e-mail account, receiving or sending text-messages, phone calls or voicemails even at home. A House Administration Committee memo advises reps to confiscate their staff's office-issued BlackBerry phones. Another House memo warns that "working in any way during a period of furlough (even as a volunteer) is grounds for disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment." Fired for texting?
Politico's Mike Allen describes the directives as "Orwellian" but it's not clear how seriously any of theestimated 1 million "non essential" employees are taking the marching orders. "Workers who may be furloughed wonder who will know if they sneak a peek and read an email or two," writes Margaret Rockat Mobiledia. "Others are betting that their bosses will go soft on enforcing the policy, by not taking the full measures to round up all the devices."

IF THEY DON'T GET A DEAL DONE BY MIDNIGHT, INSTEAD OF LEAVING THE "NON-ESSENTIAL" GOVERNMENT WORKERS AND/OR THOSE WHO ARE FIGHTING FOR OUR COUNTRY WITHOUT ANY WAY TO PAY THEIR BILLS, WHY NOT RE-CLASSIFY "NON-ESSENTIAL" TO INCLUDE CONGRESS, WHO WASTE MORE MONEY THAN ANYONE IN THE COUNTRY OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 
WHY DO THEY GET PAID?  THEY ARE NOT DOING THEIR JOBS AND MAYBE IF THEY DIDN'T GET PAID IF THEY DIDN'T MAKE THEIR DEADLINE, MAYBE THEY WOULD MAKE THINGS NICE WITH EACH OTHER AND ACTUALLY MAKE A REALISTIC GOAL.











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